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Project case studies

The Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE): A Case Study on the Supply Side of Corruption in Thailand

by:
Jack Falk
Post date: 03/20/2018
Thailand has been plagued by corruption for many years. The corruption in Thailand has hamstringed business activity, economic growth, and the political process. Corruption delegitimizes government legitimacy in Thailand. CIPE designed their project to reduce corruption through Thailand’s private sector so it would not need government assistance or approval to materialize. In addition, it was designed this way because governments don’t often last too long in Thailand.

MICROFINANCE AND ITS OUTCOMES: STUDYING POOR WOMEN, THEIR FAMILIES, AND THEIR COMMUNITIES

by:
Syeda A. Mahbub
Post date: 03/20/2018
In its efforts to create economic and social development from the bottom-up, microfinance institution Grameen Bank sent a signal to much of the developmental world that combating poverty should start on local grounds. Arguably the creator of microfinance, Grameen Bank founder Muhammad Yunus was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for crafting microcredit loans, that is lending to individuals who would not have access to traditional bank loans due to the absence of collateral and a qualifying fiscal background. Successor microfinance organizations have grown in various parts of the world and have seen economic growth and empowerment within its local communities. With 70 percent of the world’s poor comprised of women, many microfinance institutions (MFI’s) focus on lending to women.

Case Study : PLIR 4500

by:
Tayler Kehs
Post date: 03/20/2018
In Palestine, there is a gap between civil society and media, so the international NGO, Internews, partnered with Palestinian technology startup, Souktel, to create Palestine’s first open digital media platform in 2017. The program called, Supporting Civic Engagement and National Dialogue through Independent Palestinian Media has a two-pronged plan to catalyze political engagement of local CSOs, journalists, and citizens to protect the rights of women, the disabled, and children. By combining a series of journalistic and technical workshops that teach the skills needed to create higher quality reports with an open digital media platform to reach a wider audience, CSO’s and journalists can start a dialogue between citizens and the government to promote civic engagement and government accountability. 

Case Study: Pakistan Domestic Election Monitoring (Feb 2008)

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Post date: 03/20/2018
Democracy International (DI) in partnership with The Asia Foundation conducted an election-monitoring project that took a preparation time of one year from 2007 to 2008. Democracy International claims to have successfully conducted national election monitoring in the February 2008 elections.  The purpose of the mission was to “support the electorate and democracy in Pakistan by providing an expanded international presence to observe and report on the electoral process and evaluate the degree to which the elections conformed to international standards.”  In addition to the election observation missions that Democracy International carried out in February 2008, they also followed up with a postelection mission in April 2008 and preceded it with a political party assistance evaluation in December 2007.

LDAP Case Study

by:
Ria Duffy
Post date: 03/20/2018
The Local Development Assistance Program (LDAP) was a joint program involving the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the Philippine government. The $66.7 million program lasted from September 1990 to March 31, 1995. After a decade under an autocratic dictatorship regime, the goal of LDAP was to increase the decentralization of the Philippine government as well as build up the capacity of Local Government Units (LGUs). LDAP’s pursuit of aiding the increase in decentralization, local government authority, and building civic participation were all in the efforts of building stronger democratic governance in the Philippines. The main action of the program was to bolster, enhance, and compliment the Philippine government’s decentralization legislation, specifically the Local Governance Code (LGC). 

Mongolia: Business Plus Initiative

by:
Kay Khosbayar
Post date: 03/13/2018
From June 2011 to September 2015, Chemonics International implemented a $14 million project called the Business Plus Initiative (BPI) funded by USAID. BPI was designed to improve and foster a business-friendly environment by creating channels between the private and public sectors, increasing private sector competiveness, improving efficiency, reducing costs of transaction for businesses, and increasing the general public's knowledge to increase transparency about business reforms to keep the government accountable. Stakeholders There are major internal (public and private) and external stakeholders in this project including Chemonics International, USAID, the Mongolian government, and private business owners and entrepreneurs in Mongolia. Approach and Methodology

Palestinian Presidential and Parliamentary Elections in 2005 and 2006

by:
Kaitlin Jungles
Post date: 03/13/2018
The National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the Carter Center (TCC) sent two delegations of 74 and 86 people to partner with the Palestinian Central Elections Committee (CEC) and monitor the Palestinian presidential and parliamentary elections in 2005 and 2006. After observing conditions of the political climate and logistics of the election process, they met with local leaders to discuss changes to implement in order to provide more free and fair elections. This project was met with success in the areas of freedom of movement, voter registration, and in some areas, political climate. Other areas, however, that still need improvement are conditions in all categories concerning East Jerusalem, communication to voters, and certain areas of political climate. The lessons learned are as follows1. Cooperation with Palestinian and Israeli officials is both possible and productive.

Better Factories Cambodia Project

by:
Melissa Friedhoff
Post date: 03/13/2018
This case study focuses on Better Factories Cambodia (BFC)—a monitoring and remediation program of Better Work, a partnership between the UN’s International Labor Organization (ILO) and International Finance Corporation (IFC). The program is ongoing, but every few years Better Work releases progress reports and independent entities conduct impact assessments, so it is possible to consider the impact of the program within specific time frames. This case study analyzes the effectiveness of the program’s initial project from 2001 to 2010—this time frame was chosen for a few reasons: data availability, project uniqueness, and relevance to Cambodia’s democratization process.

Male Allies for Leadership Equality in Syria Case Study

by:
Ansley Bradwell
Post date: 03/13/2018
Conflict and crisis in Syria has created adversity for the Syrian population at large as it endeavors to survive amidst constant war, violence, and devastated infrastructure. Syrian families are being displaced and fleeing to neighboring countries as refugees or facing the brutal realities of a violent existence at home. Crisis and widespread conflict has forged a unique opportunity for Syrian women to step us as local leaders within their communities, where men are too involved in the conflict to manage these traditionally male roles. Although men and women in Syria have achieved roughly the same level of formal education, women have conventionally not been widely accepted into the labor market or political system. While women have achieved political representation, they struggle to advance because of limited male acceptance and an ever-increasingly more conservative social environment.

Case Study: Micro-Grant Selection via Community Voting as used in USAID Project “Approach to Participatory Management of Natural Resources”

by:
Aaron Presnall
Post date: 07/04/2017
In 2010, the Rural Development Fund, a Kyrgyzstan-based NGO, implemented an innovative method of small grants selection as part of USAID’s Approach to Participatory Management of Natural Resources program in Batken.  The Micro-Grant Program sought to foster local ownership and accountability by allowing communities themselves to select, through transparent voting, which development projects to award, rather than having program staff rate and select projects as is customary.  The results indicate improved rates of participation, motivation and quality of implementation over typical USAID small grant programs.  Though conflict over resources in Batken is ongoing, the Program Areas of Ak-sai and Ak-Tatyr exhibit continued use of democratic processes to resolve conflict.  Lessons learned include the following:

Fostering Citizen Participation and Accountable Local Government in Bangladesh

by:
Anna Eapen
Post date: 07/04/2017
Building Resources Across Communities (BRAC), with funding from the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF), created the Active Citizens and Accountable Local Government (ACALG) project to promote active citizen participation in rural Bangladesh and increase the capacity and transparency of local government bodies. The project, implemented from 2009-2011 in two districts, used components like training workshops, citizen committees, educational theater productions, and relationship-building forums to create greater linkages between rural citizens and local government. Ultimately, these components did result in true impact by empowering marginalized groups, informing government officials and citizens of their rights and responsibilities, and increasing transparency and accountability of local government. Overall, the lessons learned from this project include:

NDI/CPD 2012 Cambodian Commune Council Debate Series: A Case Study by Austin Owen

by:
Post date: 07/04/2017
             Despite nearly two decades of single party rule in parliament and the continued reign of Prime Minister Hun Sen, Cambodia has made significant democratic progress at the commune and province level. In this environment of local democratization, the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) partnered to organize a series of candidate debates during the campaign season of the 2012 Cambodian commune council elections.             In the ten debates put on as part of the project, NDI and CPD provided messaging and public speaking training to candidates, organized questioning from moderators and audience members, and worked with local radio stations to record and rebroadcast the debates prior to the election. Key details of the program are highlighted below.

Search for common ground

by:
Aidai Ismailova
Post date: 02/04/2016
There are many people who are vulnerable to Islamic radicalism due to understandable life hardships, butlittle energy is spent on actually pursuing a mission to monitor radicalism and recruitment. The Search for Common Ground is an organization that created an interesting project under the title “Supporting Media in Promoting De-Radicalization in Kyrgyzstan”. The project itself used press conferences, interviews, and research to analyze how the lack of interaction between religious and political representatives contributes to the problem of extremism and provided potential scenarios if the affairs of both entities were to improve. There were also proposals as to how relations could improve and successfully collaborate with each other. However, SFCG’s project failed to implement these changes even themselves. This detailed assessment is a simple yet comprehensive and valuable source of information exposing the consequences of government negligence. Lessons Learned:

Topic: Democracy International – AERCA

by:
Mayura Iyer
Post date: 02/03/2016
In order to increase credibility, inclusiveness, and transparency in Afghan elections, as well as reform electoral law, the process for appointing commissioners, and the voting system, USAID provided Democracy International with a grant to implement AERCA – Afghanistan Electoral Reform and Civil Advocacy project. Despite several successes of the project, including implementing a new electoral law and process for appointing commissioners, the efforts of the project were not focused enough to target key demographics, and failed to reform the voting system. Therefore, future efforts by AERCA and Democracy International must reach out to marginalized groups that have low voter engagement, and must raise awareness in targeted ways about the benefits of a voting system. Additionally, the public opinion surveys conducted by AERCA must continue in the future in order to gauge the public will towards election reform. Problems with Current Afghan Elections: