Javascript is required to view this map.

Project case studies

Case Study: Micro-Grant Selection via Community Voting as used in USAID Project “Approach to Participatory Management of Natural Resources”

by:
Aaron Presnall
Post date: 07/04/2017
Executive Summary             In 2010, the Rural Development Fund, a Kyrgyzstan-based NGO, implemented an innovative method of small grants selection as part of USAID’s Approach to Participatory Management of Natural Resources program in Batken.  The Micro-Grant Program sought to foster local ownership and accountability by allowing communities themselves to select, through transparent voting, which development projects to award, rather than having program staff rate and select projects as is customary.  The results indicate improved rates of participation, motivation and quality of implementation over typical USAID small grant programs.  Though conflict over resources in Batken is ongoing, the Program Areas of Ak-sai and Ak-Tatyr exhibit continued use of democratic processes to resolve conflict.  Lessons learned include the following:  

Fostering Citizen Participation and Accountable Local Government in Bangladesh

by:
Anna Eapen
Post date: 07/04/2017
 Executive Summary

NDI/CPD 2012 Cambodian Commune Council Debate Series: A Case Study by Austin Owen

by:
Post date: 07/04/2017
             Despite nearly two decades of single party rule in parliament and the continued reign of Prime Minister Hun Sen, Cambodia has made significant democratic progress at the commune and province level. In this environment of local democratization, the National Democratic Institute (NDI) and the Commission on Presidential Debates (CPD) partnered to organize a series of candidate debates during the campaign season of the 2012 Cambodian commune council elections.             In the ten debates put on as part of the project, NDI and CPD provided messaging and public speaking training to candidates, organized questioning from moderators and audience members, and worked with local radio stations to record and rebroadcast the debates prior to the election. Key details of the program are highlighted below.

Search for common ground

by:
Aidai Ismailova
Post date: 02/04/2016
There are many people who are vulnerable to Islamic radicalism due to understandable life hardships, butlittle energy is spent on actually pursuing a mission to monitor radicalism and recruitment. The Search for Common Ground is an organization that created an interesting project under the title “Supporting Media in Promoting De-Radicalization in Kyrgyzstan”. The project itself used press conferences, interviews, and research to analyze how the lack of interaction between religious and political representatives contributes to the problem of extremism and provided potential scenarios if the affairs of both entities were to improve. There were also proposals as to how relations could improve and successfully collaborate with each other. However, SFCG’s project failed to implement these changes even themselves. This detailed assessment is a simple yet comprehensive and valuable source of information exposing the consequences of government negligence. Lessons Learned:

Topic: Democracy International – AERCA

by:
Mayura Iyer
Post date: 02/03/2016
In order to increase credibility, inclusiveness, and transparency in Afghan elections, as well as reform electoral law, the process for appointing commissioners, and the voting system, USAID provided Democracy International with a grant to implement AERCA – Afghanistan Electoral Reform and Civil Advocacy project. Despite several successes of the project, including implementing a new electoral law and process for appointing commissioners, the efforts of the project were not focused enough to target key demographics, and failed to reform the voting system. Therefore, future efforts by AERCA and Democracy International must reach out to marginalized groups that have low voter engagement, and must raise awareness in targeted ways about the benefits of a voting system. Additionally, the public opinion surveys conducted by AERCA must continue in the future in order to gauge the public will towards election reform. Problems with Current Afghan Elections: