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Project case studies

Gallegos Case Study PAVI, Guatemala

by:
Post date: 03/13/2018
The Program Against Violence and Impunity (PAVI) in Guatemala operated from July 2009 until December 2012, funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) at $7.1 million and implemented by Tetra Tech DPK (Tt DPK). Crime and violence is a central systemic problem that plagues Guatemala. Following the 1996 Peace Accords, violence has reached the highest levels since the Civil War. Violence has inundated both rural and urban areas and is not only driven by inequality and lack of opportunities, but also narcotrafficking, arms trafficking, and gangs. 

USAID and Colombia: Human Rights Program

by:
Stephanie Davis
Post date: 03/13/2018
   - USAID’s Human Rights Program (HRP) in Colombia targeted four key areas: the promotion of a culture with human rights, prevention     of human rights violations, government response to human rights violations, and gender issues.    - In 3.5 years, the HRP was able to meet all 89 contracted deliverables and surpassed several of their goals regarding training public      officials and community members.    - Continued emphasis is needed on developing regional capacity to preform and respond to risk assessments.     - Incorporation of local stakeholders throughout the development and implementation process proved essential in ensuring sustainability     and community cooperation.     - Innovative and region-specific action plans are more effective at guaranteeing community buy-in and trust.   - Future human rights program should request a longer time frame as well as additional financial support.

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING HOLDS PERUVIAN GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE

by:
CLAIRE MARTIN
Post date: 07/04/2017
The perception of government corruption and a global decline of investigative journalism created an urgent need for an organization like IDL-Reporteros. IDL-Reporteros is a Peruvian, non-profit investigative journalism team that produces its content online in order to be more accessible to the public. Its mission according to its director is “to report, investigate, discover, and publish cases and issues affecting the rights, property, or the fate of the people.” More generally, the organization aims to utilize investigative journalism to pursue transparency and accountability even without strong state institutions. The project is funded by the Open Society Media Program (OSMP) and is a part of the Legal Defense Institute. This case study highlights the first story published by IDL-Reporteros on February 14, 2010 regarding the purchase of overpriced troop carrier vehicles by the Ministry of the Interior.

Case Study: Peru (2011-2013) “Building a Digital Democracy Network in Peru”

by:
Kristina F. Kelhofer
Post date: 07/04/2017
The Digital Democracy Network (DDN) project in Peru was an initiative of the Sixth Summit of Ex-Presidents of Latin American and the Caribbean, and was intended as a pilot project to evaluate methodologies and identify barriers to effectiveness for future digital democracy projects in the region (CGDD, 2013). The project spanned from April 1st, 2011 to March 31st, 2013, and was partially funded by the United Nations Democracy Fund (UNDEF) and partially funded and executed by the Global Center for Development and Democracy. The initiative took place in the Peruvian districts Villa María del Triunfo (VMT) and Villa El Salvador (VES), and aimed to empower citizens to engage in the democratic process in Peru and exercise their rights through technology-based platforms for government-citizen communication (CGDD, n.d.).

DEMOCRACY PROMOTION THROUGH SELF-SUSTAINABILITY

by:
Maria Barragan
Post date: 02/04/2016
This project consisted of democracy promotion through self-sustainability by empowering the people in the Valdivian Community. The aims included: better organization of the business groups, exploitation of legal opportunities, and socio-economic development of the Community. As many communities on the coast of Ecuador, Valdivia’s economic assets include: fishery, shrimp farming, craft work and tourism. The participants of this project are the Valdivian Community and Javier Barragan, an environmental lawyer. Valdivian Community decision-making body is called “Cabildo” and it is yearly elected by the 150 representative of the entire Community (5000 people). Javier Barragan is the only manager of the project, who worked closely with the community and also represented them in court cases.

The United Nations Mission in Haiti: A Study in Preserving Democracy

by:
Sarah Turkaly
Post date: 02/03/2016
The United Nations Mission in Haiti (UNMIH) was established in 1993 as a reaction to the overthrow of Haiti’s first democratically elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The mission entered Haiti in 1995 and lasted for one year. Another United Nations sponsored mission replaced UNMIH immediately after the end of its mandate. UNMIH’s mission was considered a success, however not all of its goals were satisfied. Its accomplishments included sustaining the secure and stable environment established during the multinational phase, protecting international personnel and key installations, creating a separate police force, and assisting the legitimate constitutional authorities of Haiti in establishing an environment conducive to the organization of free and fair legislative elections to be called by those authorities.

CASE STUDY: COLOMBIA (1999-2005) “Private Sector Initiative to Combat Corruption: Probidad Project”

by:
Daria Winsky
Post date: 02/03/2016
The Probidad Project was an initiative from 1999-2005 led by the Colombian Confederation of Chambers of Commerce (Confecámaras) and supported by the Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE),which sought to end corruption in Colombia, specifically within the private sector. Its main objectives were to inspire ethical standards across businesses; to reform unnecessarily convoluted procurement laws; to increase transparency of all sectors via improved communication and interaction with each other and with the media; and to educate and solidify the initiative with unrelenting online and interpersonal follow up. The Probidad Project was the first initiative against corruption initiated from the private sector, since the private sectorhistorically avoided conflict for fear of political retribution. However, the overall results of the project were very successful and impact was high:

The International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (CICIG): Success and Dependency

by:
Chelsea Ortiz
Post date: 02/03/2016
The International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala, known by its Spanish acronym, CICIG, is the first program of its kind in dealing with the problem of organized crime. Peace agreements signed in Guatemala in 1996 put to rest an era of political violence within the country, but organized crime continued to plague the country and its citizens in the years that followed.Following the request of the Guatemalan government for help addressing the problem of impunity, CICIG was established on December 12, 2006 and then put into effect September 4, 2007 as a joint effort of the United Nations and the Guatemalan government.[1]Thus, while CICIG receives financial and technical support from the international community, it operates within Guatemalan law and the Guatemalan Court System.[2]

Case Study: Democracy & Civic Participation in Argentina

by:
Noa Sager
Post date: 02/03/2016
This report evaluates the mini public library project implemented by El Desafio Foundation, a non-profit organization located and active in Rosario, Argentina. Started in April 2014, the mini library project ties into El Desafio’s larger mission to create a more active and integrated society by fighting the root causes of poverty and promoting civic participation. The mini library project is still in progress today with plans to create 30 more in Rosario, including 10 in the next six months,as well as replicate their model throughout other areas of Argentina. El Desafio’smini library project has three main objectives. (1) Promote literacy by providing opportunities for citizens to read and share books,(2) foster a sense of community in neighborhoods by providing an open space that increases interaction amongst neighbors, and (3) promote social responsibility and a sense of civic duty through increased conversation and shared ownership of the mini libraries.

Analysis of FOPEA Monitor Program

by:
JANIE WILLNER
Post date: 05/12/2014
1)      Argentina’s Constitution guarantees a freedom of expression, but it is necessary to remain vigilant against the still frequent challenges to the freedom.2)      The Foro de PeriodismoArgentino(FOPEA) established its Monitor program with the main goal of investigating, reporting, and combatting those challenges.3)      The source and nature of each case is distinct, but most reflect a fundamental conflict between journalists and authorities with connection to the government.4)      FOPEA members share a set of values and standards, and are united by the goal of defending the freedom of expression. This freedom is considered a key component of democratic society.5)      FOPEA’s leadership and members come from many different media organizations, contributing to the expansive support network to which it belongs.